Try out series: praline pop 2

photo credit: Estelle Rosenfeld

photo credit: Estelle Rosenfeld

Try out series: praline pop 1

photo credit: Estelle Rosenfeld

photo credit: Estelle Rosenfeld

Same as a praline… but on a stick!

Try out series: praline 2

photo credit: Estelle Rosenfeld

photo credit: Estelle Rosenfeld

Try out series: praline 1

photo credit: Estelle Rosenfeld

photo credit: Estelle Rosenfeld

Fourty kilos of chocolate

A few packets of sample chocolates later I chose three fairtrade ones I was happy with.

They have now arrived and this is what fourty kilos of chocolate look like, not that big after all.

But the main excitement is about the menaing of these fourty kilos: I am now able to get messy and use the skills I have learnt during my training to have a proper go at the art of making chocolate! So watch this space for more experiments, more excitement and possibly more disasters… or not.

(photo credit: Estelle Rosenfeld)

(photo credit: Estelle Rosenfeld)

The difficult task of sampling

Photo credit: Estelle Rosenfeld

Photo credit: Estelle Rosenfeld

Once I started to look out of the catalogue, I managed to find samples of chocolate. This is obviously the starting point: choosing which ethical chocolate to work with.

And once I received the samples, I had to face a very difficult task: sampling chocolate!…

Still lost in catalogue

Photo credit: Estelle Rosenfeld

Exploring a catalogue is a little bit like walking in a supermarket or a department store, you have different aisles, brands, products – specially this sort of catalogue where you can find everything from food to packaging via the tools department.

So when you’re trying to be ethical, you are facing the same issues that you would be facing if you’re trying to be an ethical consumer in a supermarket: you feel a bit lost and you reach for labels you trust like fair-trade… And in this catalogue, if you look for mixed origins Belgium chocolate chips, you can find about 70 different types. On these 70 types only 5 are fair-trade so this is all of a sudden a very limited choice… May be after all, the answer is not in the catalogue.

Lost in catalogue

Image

(Photo credit: Estelle Rosenfeld)

So after training, all that was left was experimenting.

Great!

Well, yes, great, that’s all very well, but experiment with what? All I had left was a little bowl of chocolate, not even ethical of course, as it was my training chocolate and I had no idea where it came from, and an empty gold chocolate box.

But what I had acquired too, was the chocolatier catalogue… What a tool catalogue is to prop makers and spotlight is to casting directors, or not. The good, the bad and the ugly of the art of chocolate making, from the most delicate fair-trade organic and single origin couverture chocolate to ready made evil flavouring masses.

So all that was left, was for me to explore this gold mine, humm, I meant, this catalogue.

The Art of Chocolate… the Training

After an attempt at making chocolate, I thought it was time for proper training. I had the visit of an artisan chocolatier, sharing his secrets with me and teaching me the art of chocolate.

First disaster

(Photo credit: Estelle Rosenfeld)

And this is how, the first ever chocolates resulted in a disaster… training was needed!